Cure MRSA staph infection with vitamin b3

Staph MRSA Vitamin b3 Niacinimide

Vitamin B3.

Yep. A mere vitamin seems like an unlikely candidate to stop a chronic infection such as staph or even MRSA, especially when antibiotics failed. Yet it worked for me.

I had recurring chronic staph infection for over a year. It sounds like something dirty, but it is a common problem in gyms in Thailand because of the heat. If you train in Thailand for long enough you will probably come up against this beast of an infection at some point.

Kevin_Randleman_staph_infection

Kevin Randleman had one hell of a Staph Infection

 

I can barely remember when it started. But I took nearly 20 courses of antibiotics in that time and visited hospitals numerous times on 3 different continents. I had blood tests which all came back normal. I tried numerous types of antibiotics. I tried herbs & supplements. I tried a change in diet. I tried positive thinking. Nothing worked. It came back time and time again.
It got to the point that I was very depressed because my gut flora was a mess from the frequency of the antibiotics, yet I had to take them because of the consequences of not doing so (e.g. possible amputations or death!).
 

 

I came across this study in my quest for a cure. I can’t tell you how many hours of research I put into this (it was many) over the year until I found this study. I ordered some Niacinamide and the next time I got Staph I took it at a high dose alongside my antibiotics and then for another 3+ months.

For me, Vitamin B3 (and in particular Niacinamide) was a magic bullet. I haven’t had Staph infection ever since.

If this story sounds familiar, I recommend you to try Vitamin B3. I recommend Niacinamide over Niacin, as although both are Vitamin B3, the study and the type of Vitamin B3 I used was Niacinamide.

Incase you were wondering which brand I used, it was this one.

Maybe Niacin will work too, but I’m not sure, and I also know that Niacin provides red flushing side effects in many people.

 

 

Not Sure What I’m Talking About?

The phrase staph infection is usually used somewhat vaguely to describe staphylococcus bacteria. When it is a skin infection, it’s called cellulitis, but if it enters deeper layers under the skin, it’s referred to as fasciitis and involves bone, muscle, and other tissue beneath the skin.

It’s important to note that staph is present all over the human body and is actually part of your normal skin flora, and there is plenty of it on your skin. In combat sports, an open wound combined with sweat and an active infection opens the risk of transferring staph from one fighter to another. The moist, warm environment that during our sport and around our training is a breeding ground for staph. Not only does it transfer skin-to-skin, but from the other equipment, mats, and pads used in training and in competition.

In its simplest form, staph often like a skin rash. As long as immediate treatment with a topical antibiotic is used, this simple staph infection will go away within a week give or take a few days. When the infection goes beneath the skin, it becomes a challenge to treat and heal. The deeper it goes, the more difficult it becomes to treat and heal, which often results in lancing the wound after it forms a pocket. Sometimes, even after this is done, it can resolve in a week more or less.

The issue isn’t in the treatment, but in how resistant the various strains of staphylococcus are in some cases. At this point, it’s called a super bug, or methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is a much bigger concern. Why? MRSA infections get out of hand fast, as does the ability for doctors to treat it.

Once it comes to using IV antibiotics to provide a regular, high concentration of antibodies, it can be hit or miss as far as healing is concerned. Fighters (especially MMA) are susceptible to this and often wind up in the hospital when they ignore what seems like a minor rash, or cut. Due to the nature of staph at this level, the body’s immune system is overworked causing the infection to spread more quickly.

Staph, left untreated at its simple form, will form an abscess, or a “pocket”. The acidity (pH) of the pocket varies substantially from the normal levels of the surrounding tissues. Most antibiotics won’t work in such an acidic environment. That’s why the “pocket” has to be lanced (opened up) and drained to get rid of the acid. Then the antibiotics can do their job, as can the body’s natural antibodies present in the immune system.

If this kind of infection spreads to the bloodstream, it’s renamed bacteremia. At this level, staph is starting to destroy flesh and tissue. If treatment cannot resolve it, the tissue or limb affected often has to be removed to save the person. That’s why Perez lost his big left toe. You don’t always lose a limb, but it happens when there is no other recourse.

 
Article by Fred Harrington – former professional mixed martial artist.

One Comment

    Eddy

    Wow what pictures!!! Thanks for the info staph is spreading like crazy.

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